Take a journey back in time at the Tramway Museum to when Launceston had its own tramways. Situated right next door to the Queen Victoria Museum in Iveresk, Launceston, a visit to the Tramway Museum gives visitors the opportunity to learn about the city's tramway past and features a workshop as well as a large display gallery.

Launceston’s trams ceased operation in 1952, so this is the place to learn about the history and heritage of Launceston’s tramways, as well as experience an original 1940s tram ride for yourself. The museum came about in the mid 90s as part of a restoration effort to preserve Launceston’s only remaining bogie tram. Today this community-run organisation is still working tirelessly to revive and restore the city’s charming old trams.

Young and old alike will enjoy riding the beautifully restored No. 29 bogie tram, which rolls along (almost leisurely) on a track that runs out past the Aurora Stadium. During your visit to the museum, you can listen to some intriguing tram-related tales and view some of Launceston’s oldest surviving movie footage which shows how much the city has changed since Victorian times.

You will also get the chance to explore the original tram depot workshop to view current restoration projects. Visiting with kids? The little ones are sure to enjoy exploring the interactive children’s tram exhibit, especially if they are fans of locomotives and trains.

The Launceston Tramway Museum is situated in the original Invermay Road tram depot, a stone’s throw from the city centre. The museum is open seven days a week, though tram rides only operate from Wednesday through to Sunday.

Enjoy a break at one of the nearby cafes or spend some time at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery which is adjacent to the museum. Nearby attractions on the other side of the Victoria Bridge include the tranquil City Park and the National Automobile Museum of Tasmania.

Address:
2 Invermay Rd, Invermay TAS 7248
Address:
2 Invermay Rd, Invermay TAS 7248